Can I trust my feelings?

When I wrote last week’s blog I was feeling weary. I was tired and frustrated with what can often seem like an uphill battle and a never ending one at that. It is exhausting to constantly be battling with one’s own feelings.

But how do I know which feelings I can trust? Can I trust any of them? As is the way with borderline personality disorder, feelings come and go in an alarmingly rapid succession; they are fierce in their intensity; they are often irrational and based on a colossal misconception, and yet they all seem so incredibly real.

I have talked before about my euphoria regarding the publication of my  book – intense highs and excitement followed by equally intense self-doubt and fear, with a generous helping of suspicion!

So often this is the case for me: any positive emotions are swiftly followed by vengeful negative ones, usually accompanied by suspicion or paranoia. And with all these feelings being at the most extreme end of their spectrum, the pendulum really does swing very high and very low.

When I was in TC (Therapeutic Community), there was a lot of talk about ‘being in the moment’ – talk which, at the time, drove me mad. I suspect it drove me mad because I didn’t fully understand it, and was much less able to do it; rather than admit this I scoffed at the phrase and ridiculed the notion. I now eat those words of ridicule and scoffery, as I am beginning to understand and am learning to be in the moment, if only for a second.

It is hard, when you know your emotions to be volatile and erratic, to allow to yourself to bask anywhere. You get so used to being on the run, on the defensive, waiting for the next blow in life, that you cannot dream of stopping for even a moment and soaking in the scenery. And yet I am discovering that this is exactly what I need to be doing.

There was also talk of ‘grounding’ oneself at TC, and this talk also irritated me – again (I suspect) because I was afraid of failing to master the art. But I am starting to see that ‘being in the moment’ and ‘being grounded’ are not just therapeutic platitudes; they are ways of ‘being’ who and where we are.

Rather than feeling utterly mortified about my most recent cock-up, panicking about what might happen if I cock up again, or feeling suspicious when I am not feeling mortified or terrified, I can just stop and appreciate where I am.

Recently I had an encounter which left me feeling confident about who I am. I didn’t feel inferior or ‘wrong’ as I so often do. Instead, I felt like an equal. I felt respected and respectable. Somewhere in the deep recesses of my mind I knew this feeling wouldn’t last too long (and it didn’t!), but I almost didn’t care: I allowed myself to experience the feeling rather than dismissing it as a fake feeling and worrying instead about something that didn’t matter anymore, or that didn’t matter yet.

I’m not sure that I trusted my feelings in this instance or whether, because I stayed with what I was feeling, I enabled it to prove itself. Either way, I stayed in that moment and I examined it and enjoyed it for what is was for as long as I could.

It is not uncommon for me to allow myself to be defined by my feelings, but it is uncommon for me to take stock of what the feelings are and who, in that moment, I believe myself to be. For the few minutes that the feeling of confidence did last I walked with my head held high; I felt dignified and empowered. This brief interlude, and my acknowledgement of it, was a soothing balm to my all too often battered ego. I enjoyed feeling confident, and I felt entitled to it.

I wonder, as I write this, if I might be giving the impression that I am, in general, not happy, and I want to assure my readers that this is not the case at all! I am very happy, on the whole.

I have good days and I enjoy them while they last. I have days that are a mixture of good, fun, happy, anxious, sad and fearful, with varying measures of each and I have almost got used to it – and it’s no big deal (almost).  Yes, sometimes it’s really shit and harder to manage than other days, but I have learned to pick myself up, dust myself down and get on with life. I am increasingly able to hold on to what I know to be true, rather than what feels real and true.

Borderline is what it is – feelings come and go, some are much stronger than others, they can’t always be trusted and they sometimes get me into a lot of trouble. It can be exhausting, living with borderline but, by and large, I have learned to shut out the worst of the noise and disruption it generates in my mind.

I have learned to manage, and I am happy. I am learning that whilst I cannot always trust my feelings, I am more and more able to trust myself: right at the very core of me is a small, shy voice of reason that is getting gradually stronger, and if that fails I have a very reasonable wife and some good friends who are always happy to put me straight!

My feelings might be at the mercy of whichever wind may blow them and where, but that doesn’t mean I have to go with them: I don’t have to be at the mercy of my feelings. I am learning this, as I continue my journey of self-discovery and self-management. And I am happy to say that I am happy.

 

1 thought on “Can I trust my feelings?

  1. I’m also happy that you’re happy Tracy. Bask in those moments of confidence – relish and absorb them as you deserve to do – in the manner of a cat basking in warmth and affection – with gusto! You’re a very likeable, loveable person and being in your company is very pleasurable indeed – I loved feeling the energy of your euphoria at the forthcoming publication of your book when we were on holiday.

    I’m delighted for you.

    Delighted your book will be published, delighted to have had a sneaky preview, and most of all delighted by knowing THE Tracy Barker as a friend, and as the wife of a dear pal who is, I know, thrilled to be your wife. You ROCK Mrs B! Xx

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